Thought About Food Podcast
Joey Aloi on Food and Coal in West Virginia

Joey Aloi on Food and Coal in West Virginia

March 16, 2021

This episode we spoke with Joey Aloi about his work with just transition and sustainable agriculture organizations in West Virgina, working to make Appalachia's food system more resilient, the history of that state and its relationship to food and energy, the aesthetics of experiencing natural beauty, and more! Even more than most episodes, I strongly recommend you check out the show notes for this episode.

Show Notes:

  • Follow us on Twitter at @FoodThoughtPod, and you can drop us a line at ThoughtAboutFood on Gmail. Leave us a review! It helps people find the show.
  • Joey Aloi publishes on field philosophy at the intersection of Philosophy with Environmental and Appalachian Studies.
  • One of the organizations Joey works with is Paradise Farms. Here's an interesting news article about Paradise Farms and the good work it does.
  • Paradise is one of several non-profit farms that are core members of the Turnrow Collective -- a food hub in West Virginia and a few adjacent Appalachian counties. Here's a good brief video introduction to Turnrow; here's an article about how Turnrow handled the early days of the pandemic, which we discussed in the interview; and here's Turnrow's own website.
  • The article of Joey's we discuss is Coal Feeds My Family, on the history of Appalachia through the lens of energy and food.
  • Here's a zine on issues in modern Appalachia you might enjoy: The Cornbread Communism Manifesto. It even has a recipe!
  • The recipe Joey brought for discussion was Anchovy Cauliflower Pasta. As he said in the interview, this is both a new and old tradition for his family, and we discuss Albert Borgman's work on focal practices like these. Here's the recipe!

    Ingredients:
    • olive oil
    • Flat leaf Italian parsley
    • One head of cauliflower (or broccoli if you like)
    • 2 tablespoons or a quarter cup of raisins
    • 2 tablespoons or a quarter cup of pinenuts
    • a half pound of pasta
    • a medium sized onion
    • A can of anchovies (or substitute capers, or porcini mushrooms, or sun-dried tomatoes, or a little bit of miso, or whatever gives you a nice salty umami flavor)
    • As much garlic, salt, black pepper and chili as you like 

    1. Toast the pinenuts whatever shade of brown you like (but don’t burn them!)
    2. Boil just a small amount of water, and pour it over the raisins so they can soak and get plump
    3. Cut the cauliflower into bite-size chunks, or break by hand. I usually just use the florettes, but you can toss the stems in if you want something that’s more difficult to chew
    4. Put the cauliflower in a steamer and start steaming it
    5. While you’re waiting on the cauliflower to start steaming, chop up the onion and begin to fry it in the olive oil.
    a. If you don’t wanna go overboard on the oil, make sure to open the anchovy can and pour all the oil out of it to cook the onion in before adding any more oil from the bottle
    6. When the onions are beginning to get translucent, open the anchovy jar and distribute the anchovies across the pan. I usually pull them each apart so that each one sets on the onions individually. Use your wooden spoon or whatever spatula you have to break up the anchovies and mix them around with the onions. You basically want to get rid of any chunks of anchovies, and just have it all be mixed thoroughly into the onion.
    7. Take the cauliflower out of the steamer and mix it in with the onion.
    a. You can reserve the water from steaming for the pasta, but you’ll probably need more water as well.
    b. Mixing the anchovies into the onion should’ve giving your cauliflower enough time to finish steaming, but make sure it’s pretty soft
    8. Toss the raisins and pinenuts in with the cauliflower and onion, and turn the heat down
    9. Salt pasta water so that it tastes like the sea, bring it to a boil, and then cook the pasta al dente
    10. I usually wait until I’m draining the pasta to add the garlic, salt, pepper, and any chilies, but you could add the garlic at the beginning instead if that’s your thing.
    a. I often cook this without any chilies at all, especially when it’s cauliflower and not broccoli. When I do use them, I usually just use red pepper flakes, but sometimes I’ll throw in Aleppo Pepper instead. Fresh peppers alter the flavor & texture. 
    11. Chop up the parsley as fine or coarse as you like
    12. Put the pasta on the plate, top it with the cauliflower and onion, and then with the parsley.
    13. You can add salt, pepper, or any kind of cheese (like Parmesan or whatever; don’t add provolone or ricotta.)

  • The intro and outro music is "Whiskey Before Breakfast" which is both a great traditional song and a nice companion to your aesthetic experience of nature. It was performed and shared by The Dan River Ramblers under a Creative Commons license.
Carolyn Korsmeyer on Taste

Carolyn Korsmeyer on Taste

February 22, 2021

This episode we spoke with Carolyn Korsmeyer about taste and the aesthetics of food, replicating ancient meals found in tombs, leaving sticky fingerprints on cookbooks, writing fiction novels as a philosopher, and a lot more in this wide-ranging conversation. 

Show Notes:

  • Follow us on Twitter at @FoodThoughtPod, and you can drop us a line at ThoughtAboutFood on Gmail. Leave us a review! It helps people find the show.
  • Carolyn Korsmeyer is an author of numerous books, and Research Professor of Philosophy at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York. 
  • One of the important early works on taste that we discussed was by David Hume. You can check out a version of this very interesting and influential work here, prepared by Early Modern Texts, which adapts important older texts to an easier, more modern version of English.
  • The recipe Carolyn brought for this episode is for gingerbread. As we discussed this episode, cookbooks with all their material reality of notes and stains connects us to the past, and are aesthetic objects in their own right. So rather than transcribe the recipe here, I've uploaded the scan of her cookbook as this episode's image.
  • The intro and outro music is "Whiskey Before Breakfast" which is both a great traditional song and a good way to set the stage for some gingerbread in the morning. It was performed and shared by The Dan River Ramblers under a Creative Commons license.
Josh Milburn on High-tech Alternatives to Meat

Josh Milburn on High-tech Alternatives to Meat

February 10, 2021

This episode we spoke with Josh Milburn about high-tech alternatives to meat, whether strict vegetarianism is immoral, if we morally should eat road kill or shellfish, and a lot of other topics besides, so check out the show notes! 

Show Notes:

  • Follow us on Twitter at @FoodThoughtPod, and you can drop us a line at ThoughtAboutFood on Gmail. Consider leaving us a review wherever you found the show!
  • Josh Milburn is a moral and political philosopher at the University of Sheffield.
  • Josh also interviewed me over at his podcast, Knowing Animals. Check it out! I mostly talk about Precision Livestock Farming and other high-tech methods of agriculture, but we also touch on the responsibility of academics to non-human animal harm, and my origin story of how I first started thinking about food.
  • I'm not endorsing them and I certainly don't have any kind of deal worked out with them, but Josh mentioned that if you're in the US you can get cellular agriculture/3-D printed milk right now at Perfect Day. Would you check it out? I'm not sure.
  • When the episode was recorded you couldn't buy cellular agriculture meat, but just a few weeks later, you now can (at least in Singapore) 
  • The recipe Josh shared was "Sweet Cranberry Glazed BBQ 'Ribs'" by Gaz Oakley. This episode was recorded a little before Christmas and now it's a bit after Christmas, but I think it would be good any time you're in the mood for ribs, or for "ribs".
  • The intro and outro music is "Whiskey Before Breakfast" which is both a great traditional song and a good way to try out some of the cellular agriculture discussed in this episode. It was performed and shared by The Dan River Ramblers under a Creative Commons license.
Episode 9 — Ben Almassi on Reparative Justice

Episode 9 — Ben Almassi on Reparative Justice

December 7, 2020

This episode we spoke with Ben Almassi about his new book, which looks at reparative justice for our relationship with non-humans, including other animals and entire ecosystems. We talked about a lot of topics and quite a lot of other interesting works and people for you to explore, so check out the show notes!

Show Notes:

  • Ben's book is called Reparative Environmental Justice in a World of Wounds, and is available for pre-order.
  • Follow us on Twitter at @FoodThoughtPod, and you can drop us a line at ThoughtAboutFood on Gmail. Consider leaving us a review wherever you found the show!
  • I'm organizing an online workshop with my colleague Michael Butler. It's called Digital Worlds, and the goal of the workshop is to interrogate the way modern digital technology enhances, hampers, or alters our experience of our lived worlds. If you're interested in participating or just attending, check out the website for the workshop at digitalworldsworkshop.wordpress.com
  • Ben Almassi is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Governors State University in Chicago's Southland.
  • Margaret Urban Walker's work on Reparative Justice is an important influence on Ben's book. One place you could read more is in the book Moral Repair: Reconstructing Moral Relations after Wrongdoing.
  • Eric Katz wrote a response to some of Ben's ideas, which as he says in the podcast he was able to respond to in his book (as always: if you think you don't have access to this article, you actually might through your library etc. Email the podcast if you'd like some advice on how to find out if you can actually access it).
  • Ben mentions a number of other thinkers and writers, including Aldo Leopold on being in relationship with ecosystems; Annette Baier on trust; Robin Kimerrer on ecological restoration and gratitude; Edith Brown Weiss on our duties to past and future generations; Charles Mills on ideal and non-ideal theory; Deborah McGregor on responding to environmental racism; Arthur Fine and the importance of engaged, responsive philosophy; and an extended discussion about Kyle Powys Whyte and his work on Traditional Ecological Knowledge, particularly for its governance value.
  • We also discussed an important case study in Ben's book of the Chicago Wilderness alliance. Check them out!
  • Ben defends Kale and the surprisingly delicious but often maligned Kale salad as the food he shares with us. Isa Chandra Moskowitz has two phenomenal kale salad recipes you might want to check out, one for kale Caesar salad, and one for a kale, lentil, and butternut squash salad for a colder day.
  • The intro and outro music is "Whiskey Before Breakfast" which is both a great traditional song and a good way to cope with living in a pandemic but not a homemade alternative to a vaccine. It was performed and shared by The Dan River Ramblers under a Creative Commons license.
Episode 8 — Shane Epting on Philosophy of the City and Food Sovereignty

Episode 8 — Shane Epting on Philosophy of the City and Food Sovereignty

November 3, 2020

This episode we talk to Shane Epting about Food Sovereignty, Participatory Budgeting, Time Banks and other interesting proposals in Philosophy of the City.

 

Show Notes:

  • Follow us on Twitter at @FoodThoughtPod, and you can drop us a line at ThoughtAboutFood on Gmail. Consider leaving us a review wherever you found the show!
  • Shane Epting is an Assistant Professor at Missouri University of Science and Technology.
  • The article of Shane's we were primarily discussing was Participatory Budgeting and Vertical Agriculture: A Thought Experiment in Food System Reform. As always, if you think you don't have access to the article but want to check it out, send an email to the podcast and we'll see if we can help you find it. People often have access to more scholarly articles than they think they do.
  • The example of a promising model of a vertical farm Shane referenced was Sky Greens
  • Shane mentioned "Food Sovereignty in the City: Challenging Historical Barriers to Food Justice" by Samantha Noll, a chapter in the book Food Justice in US and Global Contexts: Bringing Theory and Practice Together, which I edited with Zachary Piso.
  • We discussed participatory budgeting as a "technology for democracy." Interestingly the person who introduced both of us to that movement is the philosopher Michael Menser.
  • We also discussed time banking as a way to build community while also addressing immediate needs in people's lives, and Shane recommended the work of Mary Carmen Marcos as a good place to see someone doing academic scholarship as well as activism on the topic.
  • Ian mentioned a documentary on Havana specifically and Cuba in general working to achieve food sovereignty. It's called The Power of Community: How Cuba Survived Peak Oil, and is often available online if you google it.
  • Here's Shane's "Healthy, go-to snack for late nights: Spectacular Peanut Butter and Banana Toast

    Ingredients: 1 ripe banana, 2 large slices of whole-wheat bread, 2 tablespoons plant-based butter, 2 tablespoons of peanut butter, 1/2 tablespoon of honey

    Garnish (optional):  1 tablespoon of powered sugar, 1 orange slice

    Instructions:  Toast the bread in a toaster or toasting device. Spread butter on the back of each slice, then place the buttered side down on the plate. Spread peanut butter over the top of each bread slice using a butter knife or similar device, covering its surface evenly. Take the peeled banana and place it in the palm of your hand or on a clean surface area such as a cutting board. Smash said banana with your other hand or on the clean surface until it is flattened.  Use a rolling pin or another smashing device if necessary. Smashed banana should be about .5 inch (127 mm) thick.  Place the smashed banana on top of the peanut butter, fanning out the pieces from the center to the crust. Take the honey and drizzle it in a back-and-forth motion until it is evenly distributed across the bread. Serve open-faced with a fork and knife.

    To garnish: place powdered sugar in a circular pile on the edge of the plate, slightly larger than the orange slice. Place the orange slice on top of the powdered sugar."

  • The intro and outro music is "Whiskey Before Breakfast" which is both a great traditional song and the perfect aperitif to Shane's peanut butter toast in the morning. It was performed and shared by The Dan River Ramblers under a Creative Commons license.
Episode 7 — Food Justice and Food Sovereignty with Our Kitchen Table

Episode 7 — Food Justice and Food Sovereignty with Our Kitchen Table

October 19, 2020

This episode we talk with Lisa Oliver King and Estelle Slootmaker from Our Kitchen Table about food justice, food sovereignty, and the great projects OKT does to implement those concepts in the world.

 

Show Notes

  • Follow us on Twitter at @FoodThoughtPod, and you can drop us a line at ThoughtAboutFood on Gmail. Consider leaving us a review wherever you found us!
  • Lisa Oliver King and Estelle Slootmaker work for Our Kitchen Table, a grass-roots, nonprofit organization serving greater Grand Rapids.
  • Our Kitchen Table does amazing work, and they have resources for replicating those programs in your own organization or community. Check them out!
  • Our Kitchen Table was featured in the book Food Justice in US and Global Contexts: Bringing Theory and Practice Together, which I edited with Zachary Piso.
  • The intro and outro music is "Whiskey Before Breakfast" which is both a great traditional song and an increasingly common practice for parents helping their children with remote schooling. It was performed and shared by The Dan River Ramblers under a Creative Commons license.
  • Since we had two guests, we were lucky enough to get two recipes! Lisa Oliver King's heartily endorses Bryant Terry's recipe for greens in our episode. She also writes, "Bryant joined us for an event a few years back and has remained dear to our hearts. I always share his cookbook when we table at events.  https://www.sunset.com/recipe/garlicky-mustard-greens"
  • And here's Stelle’s recipe:

    "I love making this soup for my hubby and me. This big pot of soup lasts us two or three meals. I make and
    freeze vegetable broth from stalks, stems and leaves of vegetables we get from our CSA share all
    summer. If I don’t have sweet potatoes, it works just as well with winter squash, which we also freeze a
    lot of. This soup recipe launched my passion for making hearty soups, which have become a mealtime
    staple for us. I got this recipe when my daughter, Caitlin, worked at the People’s Food Co-op. I have
    lots of good memories of meeting her and her brother, Rob, there for lunch of coffee when I visit Ann
    Arbor."

    People’s Food Coop of Ann Arbor West African Peanut Soup
    • 1⁄2 T olive oil This big pot of soup lasts us two or three meals
    • 1 1⁄2 C Spanish onion peeled and chopped
    • 1⁄4 T minced fresh ginger
    • 1⁄2 t sea salt
    • 1⁄4 t cayenne to taste
    • 1 1⁄2 C sweet potatoes, chopped
    • 2 1⁄2 C veggie broth (may need more)
    • 3⁄4 C creamy peanut butter
    • 3⁄4 C tomato juice

    1. Sautee onions in oil until transparent. Add carrots and spices. Continue sautéing about 5
    minutes more.
    2. Add sweet potatoes and broth. Simmer until veggies are cooked through.
    3. Remove from heat. Add tomato juice and peanut butter. Process until smooth. Adjust
    consistency with more broth or tomato juice.
    4. Soup will thicken as it cools.

Episode 6 — Anne Portman on Food Sovereignty and Ecofeminism

Episode 6 — Anne Portman on Food Sovereignty and Ecofeminism

October 5, 2020

This episode we talk to my friend Anne Portman. Anne is working in an ecofeminist framework, and we discuss what that term means as well as what insights ecofeminism has about food sovereignty, our relationships with animals we might eat, and what it means to think of ourselves as things that can be eaten.

 

Show Notes

  • Follow us on Twitter at @FoodThoughtPod, and you can drop us a line at ThoughtAboutFood on Gmail. Consider leaving us a review wherever you found us!
  • Anne Portman was our guest today. Check out some of her informal writing on philosophy, parenthood, race, politics, and living in the urban American South on her blog.
  • We primarily discussed Anne's paper "Food Sovereignty and Gender Justice" which you might be able to read here. If you don't have access to it, email the podcast and we might be able to help you. Many people have access to a lot of academic articles (through libraries etc.) they don't know they do.
  • We also discussed the chapter she wrote for the book Food Justice in US and Global Contexts: Bringing Theory and Practice Together, which I edited with Zachary Piso.
  • Here's the article by Val Plumwood on being almost eaten by a crocodile, and thinking of ourselves as prey.
  • The intro and outro music is "Whiskey Before Breakfast" which is both a great traditional song and an example of prioritizing values in an emergency. It was performed and shared by The Dan River Ramblers under a Creative Commons license.
  • Here's the cookie recipe Anne shared with us:
    "My family bakes and paints cookies every holiday season. Here is the recipe share by my Aunt Dee, who also has the most extensive cookie cutter collection.

    The Cookies:

    (From Cookie Craft by Valerie Peterson and Janice Fryer)               

                    3 cups all purpose flour

                    ½ teaspoon salt

                    1 cup unsalted butter, softened

                    1 cup sugar

                    1 large egg

                    2 teaspoons vanilla (or 1 teaspoon vanilla + zest of 1 lemon)

    1. Whisk together flour and salt in medium bowl, set aside
    2. With mixer, cream butter and sugar, add egg and vanilla (and lemon zest) until well blended
    3. With mixer on low speed, gradually add flour mixture to butter mixture, mixing until thoroughly blended
    4. Turn dough out onto the work surface, divide into 2 or 3 equal portions, form each portion into a disk shape
    5. Magic step: roll out the dough between sheet of waxed paper. Do not chill first. Works best to use “cookie slats,” about ¼” thick slats of wood to keep the thickness even, but that is optional.
    6. Stack the rolled out sheets flat on a cookie sheet and chill in the refridgerator, 20-30 minutes
    7. To cut out the cookies, remove the top layer o waxed paper, cut out the cookies, transfer to cookie sheet using a flat spatula. (If too soft or sticky to move, chill again.
    8. Gather the scraps together, roll out between the waxed paper, chill, repeat
    9. Bake at 350 degree – watch carefully. They’re done with the edges are light golden. These cookies do not spread.
    10. Remove immediately from cookie sheet, cool on a cookie rack

     

    The Icing:

                    1 lb bag confectioner’s sugar

                    6 tablespoons water

                    2 tablespoons lemon juice

    Beat with a mixer, a lot, until desired consistency

    For piping, put a small amount of icing into snack-size plastic bags. Add a small amount of food color and squeeze (carefully) to mix. To pipe, cut a very small hole in the corner of the bag.

    For spreading icing, put in small cups or bowls, mix in color. Use knifes or toothpicks to decorate.

    Use the icing before it gets too hard.

    Be creative, have fun, and eat your mistakes!"

Episode 5 — Jenny Venable on Cajun Identity and Food

Episode 5 — Jenny Venable on Cajun Identity and Food

September 28, 2020

This episode I talk with Jenny Venable about Cajun cultural identity, and the role food plays in the stories we tell ourselves about who we are and who is and isn’t in our culture.

 

Show Notes:

  • Louisiana has been hit hard by Hurricane Laura, including Lake Charles where Jenny currently lives (you can read about it here: https://on.natgeo.com/3mGHufL and here: https://nyti.ms/2RQbc3J). Please consider donating to https://www.the15whitecoats.org/. Their usual work is providing resources for students of color in medical school (which is a great cause on its own!), but one of their founders is actually from Lake Charles and donors can now earmark donations for Hurricane Laura relief.
  • Follow us on Twitter at @FoodThoughtPod, and you can drop us a line at ThoughtAboutFood on Gmail. Consider leaving us a review wherever you found us!
  • Jenny Venable was our guest today. Here's a link to her article on Cajun culinary imaginary that we talked about today. (If you don't think you have access to scholarly articles, email the podcast and I might be able to help you. A lot of people have access to journals and don't know it.)
  • The intro and outro music is "Whiskey Before Breakfast" which is both a great traditional song and a good sentence to put on a vision board. It was performed and shared by The Dan River Ramblers under a Creative Commons license.
  • Here's Jenny's recipe (which by the way was fantastic!):

    "Growing up, meatball stew was one of my all-time favorite dishes, which my mama made pretty frequently. It was always served over white rice, and we often had sliced cantaloupe, canned green beans, and corn on the side. I chose to share this particular recipe because it is now one that I make pretty regularly for my family. I went many years after first becoming vegetarian without eating the comforting traditional recipes that I had grown up with because meat is often the main ingredient in Cajun dishes. But one day, when I was really missing some of my favorite meals, I decided to try my hand at veganizing them. Not only did making vegan Cajun food give me a strong sense of nostalgia, but they came out delicious. Since then, I have been veganizing my favorite Cajun recipes, which have always reminded me of home. At this point, I am trying to rethink traditional Cajun dishes in a way that is more sustainable and ethical, while recognizing and honoring the power that particular foodways continue to have in maintaining important cultural and social connections to our historical memories, our familial relationships, and to the land."

     

    Vegan Cajun Meatball Stew

     

    Ingredients:

    • 1 ½ cups peeled and chopped potato
    • 1 cup of chopped carrot
    • white rice cooked according to instructions

     

    For the meatballs:

    • 16 oz beefless ground (2 packs of beyond meat burgers OR 1 pack of beyond meat “beyond beef”)
    • ¼ finely chopped onion
    • ¼ cup chopped green onion
    • ⅓ cup breadcrumbs
    • 1 tbsp. minced garlic
    • ¼ tsp. liquid smoke
    • 1 tsp. Tony Chachere’s (or other Cajun seasoning)
    • 1 tbsp. flaxseed meal 
    • 3 tbsp. Water
    • ½ tsp. black pepper

               

    For the gravy:

    • 2 tablespoons oil
    • 1 onion finely chopped
    • 1 bell pepper finely chopped
    • 4 cloves of garlic finely minced
    • ½-¾ cup dark roux (depending on how thick you like your stew)*
    • 2 quarts water
    • 2 tbsp. better than chicken (or beef) bullion (make sure to find the vegan version!)
    • 2 tsp. garlic powder
    • 2 tsp. onion powder
    • 1 tsp. smoked paprika
    • 1 tbsp. vegan Worchestire
    • salt and pepper to taste

     

    Directions:

    1. Mix meatball ingredients well and form walnut sized balls. At medium-low heat, add 1 tbsp. of oil to a nonstick pan and turn meatballs to brown all sides (about 10-15 minutes). Remove from heat.
    2. In a medium sized pot at medium heat, add remaining oil, and cook onions, bell pepper, and garlic for gravy. Stir often until the onions are translucent and browning and bell pepper is soft. 
    3. Add roux and mix well with the onions, bell pepper, and garlic. 
    4. Stir in water and bouillon paste and bring to boil stirring often (you do not want to burn your roux) until roux is entirely dissolved. 
    5. Add garlic powder, onion powder, smoked paprika, vegan Worchestire, and salt and pepper to the pot.
    6. Stir in carrots and potatoes, partially cover, and simmer until almost fully tender (about 30-40 mins). You might need to add a bit more water. 
    7. Add cooked vegan meatballs to stew and cook on low for 15 minutes.
    8. Adjust spices.
    9. Serve over white rice.
    10. Sprinkle chopped green onion to garnish (optional).

     

    *If you are making your roux from scratch, here is a recipe.

    *To purchase roux, you can find my favorite, Savoie’s, here.

    Note: Cajun stews always taste better the next day, once all the spices and vegetables have had time to meld together!

     

Episode 4 — Joey Tuminello on Food, Drugs, and Field Philosophy

Episode 4 — Joey Tuminello on Food, Drugs, and Field Philosophy

September 21, 2020

This episode we’re talking to a friend of mine, Joey Tuminello. Joey, like me, works on a number of quite different questions in philosophy, so our conversation covers a lot of ground. We talk about the difference between food and drugs; eating invasive species; animal ethics and food ethics in the Jain religious and philosophical tradition; and we finish up by talking about his work for the activist group Farm Forward, and how that work connects back to his philosophical commitments.

 

Show Notes:

  • UPDATE: Joey Tuminello, our guest on this episode, teaches at McNeese State University. Louisiana has been hit hard by Hurricane Laura, including Lake Charles where the school is located (you can read about it here: https://on.natgeo.com/3mGHufL and here: https://nyti.ms/2RQbc3J). Please consider donating to https://www.the15whitecoats.org/. Their usual work is providing resources for students of color in medical school (which is a great cause on its own!), but Joey tells me one of their founders is actually from Lake Charles and donors can now earmark donations for Hurricane Laura relief.
  • Follow us on Twitter at @FoodThoughtPod, and you can drop us a line at ThoughtAboutFood on Gmail. Consider leaving us a review wherever you found us!
  • Joey Tuminello was our guest today. Check out his writing on Academia.edu and he said you can email him if you have questions about this episode at JosephT at farmforward.com.
  • We spent a lot of time talking about Farm Forward, where Joey is a program coordinator. Check out their work!
  • We talked about a lot of books! Probably the main one though was Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer.
  • Food Philosophy: an Introduction by David Kaplan (I'd love to have him on the show some time) is a great book we also discussed.
  • Joey also mentioned the book Cooking Eating Thinking edited by Deane Curtin and former guest on this podcast Lisa Heldke.
  • Here are some other books we talked about
  • The "invasivore" movement's website we discussed was eattheinvaders.org
  • The intro and outro music is "Whiskey Before Breakfast" which is both a great traditional song and the title of an autobiography I would definitely read. It was performed and shared by The Dan River Ramblers under a Creative Commons license.
  • Here's Joey's recipe (which by the way I made in a regular pressure cooker and can attest it was delicious!):

    "Instant Pot Vegan Louisiana-Style Red Beans & Rice (adapted and veganized from Camellia Brand Beans' recipe)

    I chose to share this recipe because it represents my own trajectory towards veganism after growing up in south Louisiana. We have some of the best-tasting food in the world, but much of it is steeped in meat and animal products. This also comes along with a lot of assumptions about authenticity and the perceived need to include meat, animal fat, etc. in our traditional dishes. Part of my interest in food ontology stems from my continual reflection on the concept of authenticity in Louisiana cuisine, as well as my view that we can retain and even enhance and develop our cultural identities without the need for animal products. Plus, I cook this all the time and it's delicious, easy, and perfect for leftovers.

    Ingredients:

    · 1 tablespoon oil

    · 1 pack of Beyond Sausage Original Bratwurst (14 oz.), or other vegan sausage

    · 1/4 stick (or 1/8 cup) vegan butter or margarine

    · 2 cups chopped seasoning blend (onions, celery, green bell peppers, parsley flakes)

    · 1 tablespoon minced garlic

    · 1 lb. dried red kidney beans

    · 6 cups water

    · 4 bay leaves

    · 6 tsp. Better Than Bouillon vegetable base (or other stock/bouillon cubes)

    · Salt to taste

    · Creole/Cajun seasoning to taste (e.g. Tony Chachere's)

    · 1/8 tsp. cayenne pepper (to taste)

    · 1/4 tsp. liquid smoke

    · 1.5 tsp. vegan Worcestershire sauce

    · Start with 1 tsp. of each of the following (add more to taste):

    · garlic powder, onion powder, smoked paprika

    · Green onions (for garnish)

    · Hot cooked rice

    Directions:

    1. Rinse and sort beans (no need to soak overnight).

    2. Press the Sauté button on the Instant Pot, add oil to pot. Add sliced sausage, and sauté for about 5 minutes or until browned. Remove sausage to a paper towel-lined plate and reserve.

    3. Add 1/4 stick vegan butter to Instant Pot, along with chopped seasoning blend and garlic, and cook until onions turn soft and clear.

    4. Add cooked sausage back to pot, along with the beans, water, bay leaves, and Better Than Bouillon vegetable base. Stir.

    5. Turn Sauté mode off. Cover, twist to lock the lid, and turn the valve to sealing. Press the Manual button and set to 100 minutes at high pressure.

    6. When the timer beeps, allow the pressure to release naturally for 30 minutes. Then, turn the valve to venting.

    7. Remove lid, and use a spoon or potato masher to mash beans to desired creamy consistency. Add salt, cayenne pepper, liquid smoke, vegan Worcestershire sauce, garlic powder, onion powder, smoked paprika, Creole/Cajun seasoning based on above amounts.

    8. Serve over hot cooked rice.

    9. Garnish with green onions."

Episode 3 — Lisa Heldke on Chomping and Being Chomped

Episode 3 — Lisa Heldke on Chomping and Being Chomped

September 14, 2020

In Episode 1, I said that conversations about food can turn into conversations about anything. That’s particularly true in this wide-ranging conversation with philosopher Dr. Lisa Heldke. We discuss how looking through the lens of food shows us that everything is always chomping and being chomped on, and that this has some profound implications on our diets, our bodies, and the world around us. We also discuss a lot of other things, including eating food from other cultures, baking, eating at a restaurant where you’re blindfolded, and many more topics besides!

 

Show Notes:

Podbean App

Play this podcast on Podbean App